(@mobilitymeg) kudos icon 1

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Snow removal policies from sidewalks

There is no overall guidance to cities and towns and states, in being sure all sidewalks are accessible in areas where snow and ice impact safe access to pedestrians using them. There are many requirements for roads to be clear of snow and ice but none for sidewalks. Enforcement of local requirements (if any is next to none).. Sidewalk snow removal should be attached to the same level of road snow removal.

Voting

9 votes
9 up votes
0 down votes
(@yaffe) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

First, Recruit Volunteers to Identify the Barriers

Can't remove unidentified barriers. Suggest that people with disabilities be recruited in this effort. Several methodologies have been used in this effort. One may be "Maps for Easy Paths (MEP): A Mobile Application for City Accessibility". Volunteers (or paid staff) can be recruited from local Centers for Independent Living. Payment is advisable both since training is required and payment is incentive to provide standardized... more »

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7 votes
7 up votes
0 down votes
(@smalaier) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Land Use Policy and Micromobility Parking

In addition to building and maintaining more accessible pedestrian infrastructure, consideration ought to be given to how land use policy promotes accessible communities by making active modes of transportation and transit more attractive and cost effective. Accessibility extends beyond the roadway, and transit-oriented development promotes access to more alternative modes that benefit people who are blind.

Also, USDOT... more »

Voting

7 votes
7 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

COVID-19 Sidewalk and Street Practices

As a result of social distancing practices during the coronavirus, restaurants and other merchants have begun to push tables and other displays further out onto sidewalks and streets. However, this practice has created a significant hurdle for blind and visually impaired pedestrians. The pathways used by such pedestrians are now cluttered with a significant number of obstacles to maneuver around. When implementing such... more »

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6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
(@myrna38717) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

We need traffic signals that can detect slower-moving peds trending idea

FHWA's MUTCD guidance (Part 4E) on pedestrian signal timing is problematic and should be revised. When FHWA published the 2009 guidance and moved to using 3.5 feet per second, you relied on two studies to support that change: 1) Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 112, Improving Pedestrian Safety at Unsignalized Crossings and 2) Institute of Transportation Engineers, The Continuing Evolution of Pedestrian... more »

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6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
(@brianp71) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Partnering with GPS Map Providers

There has already been work done on incorporating mapping services' satellite views and street views to identify accessibility barriers. DoT should partner with those providers and researchers to create a way to identify not only barriers along federally-funded routes, but also to enable states and local municipalities to piggy-back onto that technology to identify barriers along state routes and in local communities.... more »

Voting

5 votes
5 up votes
0 down votes
(@kkeyser) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

United Spinal Association

United Spinal has worked decades to bring down transportation barriers. Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, now over 30 years ago, America has been breaking down barriers in the public transportation infrastructure. Together, we have achieved much, but much more work remains. If DOT could wage a series of campaigns focusing on a specific type of barrier, raising the nation's conscience in order to... more »

Voting

5 votes
5 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Leading Pedestrian Signalization Accompanied by Accessible Ped

Cities are using leading pedestrian signalization (LLI) technology to give pedestrians on foot more time to cross intersections safely. However, blind and visually impaired pedestrians, who cannot read the visual LPI sign, learn to safely cross the street by reading the flow of traffic audibly by the sound of the parallel traffic surge. Therefore, if an accessible pedestrian signal (APS) is not installed at intersections... more »

Voting

4 votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Obstacles Presented by Micro-Mobility

The proliferation of micro-mobility devices has created a new barrier for blind and visually impaired pedestrians. This is the result of users leaving such devices, such as bicycles and scooters, inconveniently in the middle of sidewalks and curb cuts. Such practices put blind travelers at risk of tripping or colliding with the transportation devices. It is imperative that policies are implemented within systems and by... more »

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4 votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
(@janielynn) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Continuing the Conversations- Education

This interactive website is a positive first step in creating Best DOT practices moving forward, thank you. To continue an open platform for interactive conversation with how to videos and educating on accessibility to all modes of transportation for all medical devices such as but not limited to: Service Dog, Guide Dog, Arm Crutches, Manual & Electric Wheelchair, Walkers, Braces, Canes, Human Assistance, and other tools... more »

Voting

2 votes
2 up votes
0 down votes