(@myrna38717) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

We need traffic signals that can detect slower-moving peds trending idea

FHWA's MUTCD guidance (Part 4E) on pedestrian signal timing is problematic and should be revised. When FHWA published the 2009 guidance and moved to using 3.5 feet per second, you relied on two studies to support that change: 1) Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 112, Improving Pedestrian Safety at Unsignalized Crossings and 2) Institute of Transportation Engineers, The Continuing Evolution of Pedestrian... more »

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6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Obstacles Presented by Micro-Mobility

The proliferation of micro-mobility devices has created a new barrier for blind and visually impaired pedestrians. This is the result of users leaving such devices, such as bicycles and scooters, inconveniently in the middle of sidewalks and curb cuts. Such practices put blind travelers at risk of tripping or colliding with the transportation devices. It is imperative that policies are implemented within systems and by... more »

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4 votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

COVID-19 Sidewalk and Street Practices

As a result of social distancing practices during the coronavirus, restaurants and other merchants have begun to push tables and other displays further out onto sidewalks and streets. However, this practice has created a significant hurdle for blind and visually impaired pedestrians. The pathways used by such pedestrians are now cluttered with a significant number of obstacles to maneuver around. When implementing such... more »

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6 votes
6 up votes
0 down votes
(@clairestanley) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Leading Pedestrian Signalization Accompanied by Accessible Ped

Cities are using leading pedestrian signalization (LLI) technology to give pedestrians on foot more time to cross intersections safely. However, blind and visually impaired pedestrians, who cannot read the visual LPI sign, learn to safely cross the street by reading the flow of traffic audibly by the sound of the parallel traffic surge. Therefore, if an accessible pedestrian signal (APS) is not installed at intersections... more »

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4 votes
4 up votes
0 down votes
(@mobilitymeg) kudos icon 1

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Snow removal policies from sidewalks

There is no overall guidance to cities and towns and states, in being sure all sidewalks are accessible in areas where snow and ice impact safe access to pedestrians using them. There are many requirements for roads to be clear of snow and ice but none for sidewalks. Enforcement of local requirements (if any is next to none).. Sidewalk snow removal should be attached to the same level of road snow removal.

Voting

9 votes
9 up votes
0 down votes
(@fstepfer) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Adopt the PROWAG trending idea

The framework includes :

"Work to advance national standards on rights of way accessibility, including with partner organizations."

 

Fully Adopting the PROWAg (the 2011 Proposed Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way)

into the MUCTD would remove barriers to ensuring access to pedestrian travel routes. Currently the ADA and DOJ standards do not adequately provide for equal access to the public... more »

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13 votes
13 up votes
0 down votes
(@bbentzen) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Include design guidance for a delineator at separated bike lanes

Separated bicycle lanes at sidewalk level are especially dangerous for pedestrians who are disabled. Design guidance for such facilities should include a standard tactile delineator between the bicycle lane and the pedestrians way that is highly detectable to pedestrians who are vision disabled, that discourages cyclists from intruding into the pedestrian way, but that is negotiable by pedestrians having mobility disabilities.... more »

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11 votes
11 up votes
0 down votes
(@bbentzen) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Ensure safe access for vision disabled to boarding islands

Floating boarding islands are increasingly being used in association with separated bicycle paths at sidewalk level. Pedestrains who are vision disabled need perceptible information about where to cross bike lanes to get to boarding islands. Tactile walking surface indicators should be used to alert pedestrians who are vision disabled to bike lane crossings. Surface treatments and markings should be used to alert cyclists... more »

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13 votes
13 up votes
0 down votes
(@bbentzen) kudos icon 1

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Include requirements for accessible pedestrian signals in MUTCD

Accessible pedestrian signals are needed wherever pedestrian signals are provided. Accessible communication of something as basic and necessary for life safety of pedestrians who are blind as pedestrian signal information is essential. The upcoming NPA for the MUTCD should require accessible pedestrian signals wherever there are visual pedestrian signals as required in Draft PROWAG.

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14 votes
14 up votes
0 down votes
(@janetmbarlow) kudos icon 2

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Bring the MUTCD in line with proposed PROWAG in the upcoming NPA trending idea

Do not delay in advancing national standards on rights-of-way accessibility. I'm aware that the MUTCD team is working on an NPA. Make sure that NPA incorporates accessibility issues.

In particular, FHWA should move forward in requiring accessible pedestrian signals where pedestrian signals are installed. As I noted in earlier comments, the complexity of signal systems and timing make previous techniques obsolete. Proposed... more »

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14 votes
14 up votes
0 down votes
(@sharoncoral) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

BUS STOPS need to be ACCESSIBLE not DANGEROUS

Bus stops placed where there is NO accessibility for wheelchairs put the wheelchair user in TRAFFIC and is VERY Dangerous to the wheelchair user. Such as: a curb does not allow the wheelchair user to be on the walk or grass as ambulatory persons are able to do. Thus leaving the wheelchair user in the Street. Including persons like myself in a power wheelchair with my SERVICE DOG. Now we are BOTH at Risk. To top it off,... more »

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12 votes
12 up votes
0 down votes
(@shycpat3148) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Community accessibility

Community accessibility To me means having access to transit I put this in this goal of the framework because often times repairs are needed in communities. Not having the funding or the necessary ability because of tax structure Or definition of a public right away poses an unnecessary bare barrier we need to follow PROWAG and ensure that mobility chair users do not have to ride or walk the street to get to places in... more »

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9 votes
9 up votes
0 down votes
(@mrog1) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Sidewalks

Hi, one of the biggest barriers to people with mobility issues is a bad sidewalk. Many sidewalks are in disrepair, this must change. Secondly, snow removal is a huge. It should not be up to business owners to clear bus stops of any impediments. It should be the municipality. It is Public Transportation. Thank you.

Voting

9 votes
9 up votes
0 down votes
(@kkeyser) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

United Spinal Association

United Spinal has worked decades to bring down transportation barriers. Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, now over 30 years ago, America has been breaking down barriers in the public transportation infrastructure. Together, we have achieved much, but much more work remains. If DOT could wage a series of campaigns focusing on a specific type of barrier, raising the nation's conscience in order to... more »

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5 votes
5 up votes
0 down votes
(@janielynn) kudos icon +

Goal 1: Remove unnecessary barriers

Continuing the Conversations- Education

This interactive website is a positive first step in creating Best DOT practices moving forward, thank you. To continue an open platform for interactive conversation with how to videos and educating on accessibility to all modes of transportation for all medical devices such as but not limited to: Service Dog, Guide Dog, Arm Crutches, Manual & Electric Wheelchair, Walkers, Braces, Canes, Human Assistance, and other tools... more »

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2 votes
2 up votes
0 down votes